A Mike and His Words

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femininefreak:

intimesgonebyblog:

Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry.
She registered for the race under the gender-neutral “K. V. Switzer. Race official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove her from the race, and according to Switzer said, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend Tom Miller, who was running with her, shoved Semple aside and sent him flying, and other runners provided a shield for her. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

Was just talking about this to my mother the other day…Katherine Switzer’s interview in The Makers is pretty awesome.

femininefreak:

intimesgonebyblog:

Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry.

She registered for the race under the gender-neutral “K. V. Switzer. Race official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove her from the race, and according to Switzer said, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend Tom Miller, who was running with her, shoved Semple aside and sent him flying, and other runners provided a shield for her. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

Was just talking about this to my mother the other day…Katherine Switzer’s interview in The Makers is pretty awesome.

(via lauriehalseanderson)

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For Those In Strong Recovery from Eating Disorders

Since my book STARVED has been published, I’ve been amazed and humbled by the number of people who have contacted me to tell me about their own personal struggles with eating disorders.  Usually I hear from folks who say the book helped them realize they have a problem, and some have said the book inspired them to get counseling. 

What more could an author ask for, really?  It’s been great to know something I wrote could help someone else like that.

But I’ve been increasingly curious about those who are in strong recovery from eating disorders.  I can’t help but wonder:  What did you learn about yourself, or your disorder, because of your recovery process that you didn’t realize before?

I’d love to know, if you’re comfortable sharing.

Please, no “pro-ana” responses.  That’s not recovery; that’s illness.

Filed under anorexia bulimia eating disorders boys with eating disorders men with eating disorders recovery

23,860 notes

itsoktobegay101:

Leviticus says that one can not cut their hair, shave their beard, harvest the corners of their fields. It also says that one can stone their children to death for talking back to them. But whatevs, we’ll just focus on that one about gay people. 

itsoktobegay101:

Leviticus says that one can not cut their hair, shave their beard, harvest the corners of their fields. It also says that one can stone their children to death for talking back to them. But whatevs, we’ll just focus on that one about gay people. 

(via lauriehalseanderson)

50 notes

minutemanworld:

What do we mean by revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution’ it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington.

Letter from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson

I want to reemphasize this point again, and keep reemphasizing it, because it’s something that’s not widely understood because of the way the American Revolution is taught because of the focus on the “Founding Fathers”. 

The documents in the pictures above are town records from the town of Worcester Massachusetts, Worcester was one of the more radical of the Massachusetts towns in the early 1770s, and it became even more radicalized after the passage of the Coercive Acts (especially after the Massachusetts Government Act).

On September 9, 1774, 4,622 militia men from Worcester county met in the town to shut down the courts and force the court officials to swear an oath to not ever infringe on the rights of the people (we know the exact number of men because someone who was there took an exact count and noted it in their journal along with a note of which towns sent how many men).

Then on October 4, 1774 the town sent Timothy Bigelow to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress with these instructions:

You are to consider the people of this province absolved, on their part, from the obligation therein contained [the 1691 Massachusetts charter], and to all intents and purposes reduced to a state of nature; and you are to exert yourself in devising ways and means to raise from the dissolution of the old constitution, as from the ashes of the Phenix, a new form, wherein all officers shall be dependent on the suffrages of the people, whatever unfavorable constructions our enemies may put upon such procedure.

In 1774 the people of Massachusetts drove royal authority out of every town and village except Boston by the end of the year. They did the same thing in most of the towns and villages of New England as well, and by the end of 1775 had done the same for many other cities and towns up and down the seaboard of America. It was Congress that was lagging in declaring independence.

If anything the Declaration of Independence was a statement of a done deal (politically speaking) rather than a bold leadership move, especially when you consider how the historian Pauline Maier has found 90 other declarations of independence made by towns or other governmental bodies before the one made by the Continental Congress. 

(via lauriehalseanderson)

24,010 notes

humansofnewyork:

"I was an English teacher. The demands of the system required that I give out grades, but I never felt good about it. How do you grade someone’s writing? Writing is about revision. It’s about access to self. If a student writes a poem, and it’s the best they can do at the moment, how are you supposed to compare that to the student sitting next to them? How are you supposed to give one a 90, and one an 85?"

humansofnewyork:

"I was an English teacher. The demands of the system required that I give out grades, but I never felt good about it. How do you grade someone’s writing? Writing is about revision. It’s about access to self. If a student writes a poem, and it’s the best they can do at the moment, how are you supposed to compare that to the student sitting next to them? How are you supposed to give one a 90, and one an 85?"

(via lauriehalseanderson)